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Behavior

  • Many excitable and rowdy behaviors that we see in puppies will diminish with time and proper early training. For helpful information see our handouts on Puppy getting started right and Puppy training. The unruly dog is one that continues to be difficult for the owner to manage past puppyhood or 6 - 9 months.

  • Dreaming is similar in dogs as it is in people and is a normal part of the rest period. Nightmares do not appear to be typical but you can see different breathing patterns and some movement of the legs while your dog is dreaming.

  • Just like people, your dog can mourn when there has been a loss in their world. The symptoms are very similar actually. There are ways that you can help with some guidance from your veterinarian or a behaviorist if needed.

  • Behavior problems with your dog may need to be addressed by a trainer, certified animal behaviorist, or boarded veterinary behaviorist. Determining what level of help you need depends on the problem and if medical issues have been ruled out. Behavioral problems can take time and patience is a must.

  • Dogs love their owners unconditionally and science has proven as such. Their senses of smell and hearing are intensely tied to their recognition of their family members.

  • Most dogs' ears are a lot larger and their ear canals are much longer than ours are. They are certainly a lot more sensitive. We usually only need to clean them when there is a problem; however at this point they may already be sore, so that the dog learns that handling around the ears is painful and tries to avoid it.

  • Despite the fact that recent studies have re-evaluated hierarchy models and have modified our understanding of behavior in the wild wolf, the concept of a hierarchal relationship among dogs and humans continues to be perpetuated. To ensure a well functioning family group, a family needs to know more about canine behavior than outdated strategies focusing on pack structure.

  • Dogs are social animals whose evolutionary history makes them willing and able to live in groups. Group living enabled the dog's ancestors, wolves, to work together to obtain food, raise their young and defend their territory.

  • Play with owners and with other dogs provides your dog not only with an outlet for physical exercise, but also helps to fill your dog's social needs.

  • Many behavior problems have a component of fear, anxiety or excessive arousal so that retraining cannot begin until a calm, relaxed state can be achieved on cue. Training should focus on both the behavioral response (sit, down, walk, stay on your mat) as well as the emotional state (calm, relaxed).